Sunday Morning 1/16: Unit 4, Session 3: God Parted the Red Sea

God’s people were finally free. After 430 years of slavery in Egypt, the Israelites—now numbering 600,000 men plus their families—were on their way out with Moses as their leader. God had promised to give them a new land: “a land flowing with milk and honey” (Ex. 3:17). 

What did sudden freedom feel like? Did the Israelites feel strong and courageous? Did they feel nervous and vulnerable? Regardless of their thoughts and emotions, one thing was certain: God was with them.

We see in the story of Exodus 13–15 that God directed His people, fought for His people, and ultimately delivered His people.

First, God directed His people. We see this clearly in God’s choice of the route for the Israelites. God knew if the Israelites took the road into the land of the Philistines, they would face war and decide to go back to Egypt. So God led them toward the Red Sea. He knew Pharaoh would pursue them. 

Would Pharaoh stop God’s plans? No. On the contrary, the threat of Pharaoh and his army would bring God glory and cause the Egyptians to know that the God of the Israelites is the Lord.

The Egyptians pursued the Israelites, and God fought for His people. Imagine the Israelites’ fear in seeing their oppressors approaching. They were terrified! First, they cried out to God for help. Then they turned to Moses with accusations. Had Moses brought them there to die? Moses was confident: “Don’t be afraid. … The LORD will fight for you” (Ex. 14:13-14).

And He did. God parted the waves of the Red Sea for the Israelites to walk through. When the Egyptians followed, God threw them into confusion and let the waters crash back over them.

God delivered His people. The Israelites saw God’s power and did what Pharaoh and the Egyptians refused to do: They feared the Lord. Exodus 15 records their song to God, reflecting on His power and faithful love for His people.

In an even greater display of His power and faithful love, God provided His Son, Jesus. Jesus is greater than Moses. 

Through faith in Jesus, God delivers us from sin and death. 

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus is better than Moses because He saves people from sin. 
  • Younger Preschool: God set His people free from the Egyptians. God sets us free from sin through His Son, Jesus.
  • Older Preschool: Moses led God’s people out of Egypt, and God made the way to freedom across the Red Sea. Moses was a great leader, but the Bible says Jesus is greater. God gives us freedom from sin through His Son, Jesus.
  • Kids: Moses led the Israelites out of Egypt, and God provided a way for them to escape through the Red Sea. The Bible says that Jesus is greater than Moses. (Hebrews 3:3) People who trust in Jesus escape the penalty of sin and have eternal life.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises.
  • Older Preschool: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises.
  • Kids: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises because He is faithful. 

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God keeps His promises. — Numbers 23:19
  • Younger Preschool: God keeps His promises. — Numbers 23:19
  • Older Preschool: God is not a man, that he might lie … Does he speak and not act, or promise and not fulfill? — Numbers 23:19  
  • Kids: God is not a man, that he might lie, or a son of man, that he might change his mind. Does he speak and not act, or promise and not fulfill? — Numbers 23:19

** Next week: God Keeps His Promises (Isaiah 9)

Sunday Morning 1/9: Unit 4, Session 2: God Delivered His People

God’s heart is for His people. When the Israelites cried out to the Lord, He heard them and had a plan to rescue them from their suffering. 

That’s why God called Moses back to Egypt. Though Moses had been raised among the royal household in Egypt, his heart was for his own people too. God chose Moses to deliver the enslaved Israelites after a series of plagues

God’s purpose in sending the plagues was not only to get His people out of Egypt; the plagues would put God’s power on display and stand as acts of judgment against the Egyptians. (See Ex. 7:4-5.) The plagues made life in Egypt uncomfortable. In some instances, the people suffered terribly.

The plagues did convince some of Pharaoh’s officials to take God’s word seriously, but other Egyptians—including Pharaoh—refused to humble themselves. It was the tenth plague, the death of the firstborn, that finally got Pharaoh to send the Israelites out of his land.

The heart of the gospel is found in the story of the Passover. The Israelite people were sinful; they deserved death just as much as the Egyptians did, but God graciously provided a way out to keep the promises He made to Adam and Eve in Genesis 3 and to Abraham in Genesis 12 and 15. 

At the Passover, the Israelites killed a lamb instead. By marking their doorposts with the blood of a lamb, the Israelites were spared from the judgment and death they deserved. 

God kept His promise to rescue His people from the power of the Egyptians. Each year, the Israelites remembered this miraculous event by observing the Passover festival.

Jesus never sinned, but He was crucified for our sins. We too are deserving of death, but the blood of Jesus—the Lamb of God—covers all who trust in Him and sets us free from sin and death. 

God is faithful to keep His promises. He calls us to remember that Jesus has freed us from slavery to sin so we are free to live for His glory.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus is the Lamb of God who takes away sin. 
  • Younger Preschool: God kept the Israelites safe. Everyone who trusts in Jesus is kept safe from the punishment for sin.
  • Older Preschool: God kept the Israelites safe from punishment when they put the blood of a lamb over their doors. Jesus is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world. Jesus was punished for sin when He died on the cross, and everyone who trusts in Jesus is kept safe from the punishment for sin.
  • Kids: By His grace, God spared the Israelites from judgment by requiring the blood of a lamb. Jesus is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world. His death was the ultimate sacrifice, and those who trust in Jesus are under His saving blood and will be passed over in the final judgment.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises.
  • Older Preschool: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises.
  • Kids: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises because He is faithful. 

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God keeps His promises. — Numbers 23:19
  • Younger Preschool: God keeps His promises. — Numbers 23:19
  • Older Preschool: God is not a man, that he might lie … Does he speak and not act, or promise and not fulfill? — Numbers 23:19  
  • Kids: God is not a man, that he might lie, or a son of man, that he might change his mind. Does he speak and not act, or promise and not fulfill? — Numbers 23:19

** Next week: God Parted the Red Sea (Exodus 13–15)

Sunday Morning 1/2: Unit 4, Session 1: God Called Moses

Moses’ life was in danger from the moment he was born. He was an Israelite—a descendant of Israel (Jacob)—living in Egypt after Jacob’s family had moved there, seeking food during a famine. 

Four hundred years later, this family had grown and multiplied. Moses’ parents, Amran and Jochebed, likely lived in fear of the pharaoh who ruled Egypt and took drastic measures to oppress the Israelites. Could God’s promises for His people stand against such opposition?

Jochebed hid her baby boy as long as she could—about three months—before she put him in a basket among the reeds of the river. She couldn’t have known that Pharaoh’s daughter would find him and want to raise him as her own, or that the princess would let Jochebed care for him until he was old enough to be raised as an Egyptian prince. She couldn’t have known that her son would grow up to deliver the Israelites out of Egypt. But God knew. All along, God had a plan for Moses and His people.

God appeared to Moses years later. Moses was a shepherd then, having grown up in Egypt’s royal household only to flee as a murderer to Midian. There, Moses started a family and worked as a shepherd, perhaps never imagining he would see Egypt again. 

But one night, God drew a curious Moses to Himself and spoke through a burning bush. You see, God remembered the promise He made to Eve in Genesis 3. He remembered His covenant with Abraham in Genesis 12, which He repeated to Isaac and Jacob. So many years had passed, but God remembered His promises.

Moses was inadequate for the task of rescuing the Israelites, but God promised His power and presence. So in the early chapters of Exodus, we see Moses return to Egypt to confront Pharaoh—acting as a mediator between the Israelites and their burdensome king. 

As you consider Moses’ calling, look forward to an even greater calling and rescue—the call of Jesus to come to earth to save God’s people from their sin. Jesus is greater than Moses. Moses delivered God’s people from physical captivity; Jesus delivers God’s people from captivity to sin and death.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God sent Jesus to rescue people. 
  • Younger Preschool: God chose Moses to save God’s people from the king of Egypt. God planned and sent Jesus to earth to save people from sin.
  • Older Preschool: God saved Moses’ life so Moses could grow up and save God’s people from the Egyptian pharaoh. God planned for His Son, Jesus, to save people in an even better way. God sent Jesus to earth, and Jesus gave up His life to save us from our sin.
  • Kids: God saved Moses’ life and called him to rescue God’s people from slavery. The calling of Moses points to a greater calling and rescue—the call of Jesus to come to earth to save God’s people. Jesus gave up His life to save us from slavery to sin.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises.
  • Older Preschool: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises.
  • Kids: Does God keep His promises? Yes, God always keeps His promises because He is faithful. 

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God keeps His promises. — Numbers 23:19
  • Younger Preschool: God keeps His promises. — Numbers 23:19
  • Older Preschool: God is not a man, that he might lie … Does he speak and not act, or promise and not fulfill? — Numbers 23:19  
  • Kids: God is not a man, that he might lie, or a son of man, that he might change his mind. Does he speak and not act, or promise and not fulfill? — Numbers 23:19

** Next week: God Delivered His People (Exodus 5–12)

Sunday Morning 12/26: Unit 3, Session 6: God Controls Everything

In research, there is a common practice used to measure data: the pre-test and post-test. The pre-test is a baseline, assessing the state of something prior to experimental factors being introduced. As is suggested by the name, this happens prior to the experiment. 

The post-test is a comparison, designed to compare the outcome of the experiment to the pre-test results in order to assess change. As the name suggests, the post-test comes after the experiment. 

In the life of Job, we find a man who goes through the most traumatic experiences imaginable. Job lost his kids, his wealth, his career, and his friends. His sheep even burned up! (It’s true, read Job 1:16.) Job’s life was turned upside down. His joy was low and his sorrow was high. 

It’s fascinating to look at Job’s life before and after this series of trials. Prior to Job’s losing all he had, Job is described as blameless and upright, fearing God and turning away from evil. He had great spiritual fortitude and great material wealth.

Following his extended trial, Job repented of his wavering trust in God. Job was restored to God, and God restored his wealth to a greater degree than before. 

The pre-test and post-test of Job’s journey demonstrate a man who, in the big picture, was unshakable in his relationship with God. Though he had high and low moments during the trial, Job was fully restored to God. Like Job, our faithfulness does not mean that there won’t be moments of struggle or slipping, but it does mean that overall, our faith in God remains and grows.

If you aren’t in the midst of a trial, know that God is strengthening your trust in Him so that when difficulty does come—and it will—your pre-test shows a strong faith that can endure. And if you are in the midst of great challenges right now, strive to endure so that a post-test might demonstrate that your love and trust of God has remained and even increased. 

Trials are inevitable. Trust in God, who controls everything. Anticipate that trials will come, and aim for growth on the other side.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: We can trust Jesus.
  • Younger PreschoolThe story of Job reminds us of Jesus. Job had hard times. Jesus had hard times, too, but He never sinned. He saves us from sin. Jesus comforts us when we hurt, and we can trust Him.
  • Older Preschool: The story of Job reminds us of Jesus. Jesus is the only person who never sinned, but He suffered to take the punishment for our sin. Jesus comforts us when we suffer, and we can trust Him.
  • Kids: Job learned that God is all-powerful, sovereign, and good. When we face suffering, we can hope in God. God sent Jesus, the only truly innocent One, to suffer and die so that everyone who trusts in Him can have forgiveness and eternal life.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Who makes everything happen? God makes everything happen.
  • Preschool: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • Kids: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. Nothing is outside of God’s good plan.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Younger Preschool: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Older Preschool: The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:6
  • Kids: I know that the LORD is great; our Lord is greater than all gods. The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:5-6

** Next week: God Called Moses (Exodus 1-4)

Sunday Morning 12/19: Unit 3, Session 5: God Had a Plan for Joseph

The story of Joseph is packed full of moments that resonate with us. Maybe you were the favorite child or the favorite child’s sibling. Some people resonate with being cast away from family or being undeservingly welcomed into a new family. Some resonate with finding favor with an enemy or showing favor to an enemy. In Joseph’s story, we can see ourselves and our need for Jesus in so many ways. 

On at least four occasions in Joseph’s journey, others gave him tremendous blessings. Though Joseph lost some of these earthly treasures, he remained faithful to the Lord. We normally focus on Joseph’s adversity, but we can’t miss that both the lows and highs of Joseph’s life were also marked by God’s blessing through others.

First, Joseph’s father blessed him with a beautiful multi-colored robe as a representation of his favored status. This tangible symbol was taken from him when his brothers sold him into slavery. Yet Joseph remained faithful.

Next, Potiphar blessed Joseph by making him overseer of his entire household. The role lent itself to all the tangible and monetary things anyone could want. But when Joseph fled from the advance of Potiphar’s wife, it was all taken from him. Yet Joseph remained faithful. 

Third, the prison warden blessed Joseph by making him overseer over the entire prison. Finally, Pharaoh blessed Joseph by placing him as second in command over all of Egypt, putting Joseph in a position to save his family from famine.

Joseph refused to let the evil actions of others steal his faith. When he had the chance to take away from others who had taken from him, Joseph showed generosity instead.

We experience various common grace blessings from the Lord every day. These blessings can tempt us to worship the gift rather than the Giver. Like Joseph, we must remain steadfast under trial and faithful to the Lord. In famine and in plenty, blessed be the name of the Lord. He is good and in control.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God’s plan was to send Jesus.
  • Younger Preschool: Joseph’s brothers hurt Joseph. One day, people would hurt God’s Son, Jesus. God’s good plan was to use Jesus’ death to save His people from sin.
  • Older Preschool: Joseph’s brothers hurt Joseph, but God had a good plan. God used Joseph’s hurt to save His people from hunger. One day, people would hurt God’s Son, Jesus. God’s good plan was to use Jesus’ death to save His people from sin.
  • Kids: God had a plan for Joseph’s life. He allowed Joseph to suffer in order to rescue a whole nation. God planned for Jesus to suffer so that many—people from all nations—would be saved.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Who makes everything happen? God makes everything happen.
  • Preschool: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • Kids: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. Nothing is outside of God’s good plan.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Younger Preschool: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Older Preschool: The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:6
  • Kids: I know that the LORD is great; our Lord is greater than all gods. The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:5-6

** Next week: God Controls Everything (Job)

Sunday Morning 12/12: Unit 3, Session 4: God Changed Jacob

Jacob’s journey in Genesis is one of unexpected and undeserved blessing after blessing. With a name that literally means he cheats, Jacob was unlikely to receive the privilege and opportunity God gave him.

Jacob was a cheater, a liar, and a deceiver. He was quiet and not strongly gifted. And he was gullible, too. We cannot miss that the deceiver was deceived at times too—easily convinced by his mother and tricked by his uncle. But God would work through Jacob when no circumstances or characteristics made it seem possible. 

In Genesis 32:10, Jacob expressed his own bewilderment to the Lord. “I am unworthy of all the kindness and faithfulness you have shown your servant. Indeed, I crossed over the Jordan with my staff, and now I have become two camps.”

Jacob came to realize that nothing that he had accomplished or accumulated was the result of his own doing. He was not capable or competent enough to produce the many good things he had received and especially not to be the recipient of the promise of God to make his family like the dust of the earth. Jacob was humbled by the reality that through him and his offspring, all of the families of the earth would be blessed.

Have you ever had a moment of astonishment at the magnitude of what God has given you through Christ? Have you taken the time to recognize that all that you have is from God? Does it cause you to rejoice when you think about God’s grace?

It’s easy to look at Jacob and say he didn’t deserve what God gave him. It’s hard to feel that way about ourselves. But it’s just as true.

Paul wrote in Romans 6:23, “For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Salvation should bring about this astonishment in us as well. It should remind us that we are not worthy, and it should lead us to rejoice in the undeserving gift of God’s grace.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God calls us His children.
  • Younger Preschool: God gave Jacob a new name, Israel. When we follow Jesus, God calls us His children.
  • Older Preschool: God changed Jacob’s life and gave him a new name, Israel. By dying and rising from the dead, Jesus made the way for us to be adopted into God’s family. When we trust in Jesus, we get a new name, too—children of God.
  • Kids: God changed Jacob’s life and gave him a new name, Israel. Jesus came so that we might have a changed life, forgiven of sin. Jesus’ death and resurrection provided sinful people the way to be adopted into God’s family. When we trust in Jesus, we also receive a new name—children of God.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Who makes everything happen? God makes everything happen.
  • Preschool: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • Kids: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. Nothing is outside of God’s good plan.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Younger Preschool: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Older Preschool: The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:6
  • Kids: I know that the LORD is great; our Lord is greater than all gods. The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:5-6

** Next week: God Had a Plan for Joseph (Genesis 37–50)

Sunday Morning 12/5: Unit 3, Session 3: God Provided Isaac

It’s been said that when a word or phrase is repeated in the Bible, we ought to pay close attention. In Genesis 22, Abraham repeated one phrase three times: “Here I am.”

Abraham first used “Here I am” on his journey when God called his name. Abraham’s eager response to God shows that he was ready and expectant to hear from God. 

Abraham then used this phrase in response to his son, Isaac. On the journey to the place of sacrifice, Isaac called out to his father and Abraham responded, “Here I am.” Even though Abraham was surely wrestling with what God had commanded him to do, he was eager to hear from his son and help him understand what God was doing.

Third, Abraham responded to the angel of the Lord: “Here I am.” The angel called Abraham’s name twice as he was about to sacrifice his son in obedience to God. Even in a tense and emotional moment, Abraham was sensitive to the Lord and eager to hear from him.

Abraham’s use of this phrase clearly shows his open-handed readiness to serve. Abraham responded to the Lord, to his son, and to the angel from his humble heart and willing spirit. Instead of shutting down and stopping his ears to God because of the incredibly challenging task God had put before him, Abraham remained steadfast in His openness to the Lord.

God desires that we always be ready for however He may intend to use us for His glory and our good. It may be as we drive along in the car, as we hurry through a long list of tasks at work, or in the stillness of a quiet moment with the Lord early in the morning. It also may come in the intensity of grieving the loss of a loved one, navigating conflict in the body of Christ, or as we gather with others to worship. Whenever we sense the leading of the Spirit of God, may we take a posture similar to Abraham, always willingly to say, “Here I am.”

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God loves us and keeps His promise.
  • Younger Preschool: Abraham loved God. He was willing to give up his son Isaac, but God provided a ram. God loves us. He gave His Son, Jesus, to save the world from sin.
  • Older Preschool: Abraham loved God. He was willing to give up his son Isaac, but God provided a ram so Isaac could live. God was willing to give up His Son, Jesus, to save the world from sin. Jesus offered His life as a sacrifice for our sin so we can live.
  • Kids: Abraham showed his love for God by being willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. God provided a ram instead. This is how God showed His love for us: He sent His Son, Jesus, to die on the cross so that we could have eternal life through Him.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Who makes everything happen? God makes everything happen.
  • Preschool: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • Kids: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. Nothing is outside of God’s good plan.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Younger Preschool: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Older Preschool: The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:6
  • Kids: I know that the LORD is great; our Lord is greater than all gods. The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:5-6

** Next week: God Changed Jacob (Genesis 25–33)

Sunday Morning 11/28: Unit 3, Session 2: Melchizedek Blessed Abraham

We marvel at stories with two characters who are total opposites of each other. This is why so many stories feature some form of a noble hero and an immoral villain. The contrast of character and conduct is what drives the tension of the story. 

In Genesis 14, we find two completely opposite kings: the king of Sodom and the king of Salem. One sought to get; the other sought to give. One sought to curse; the other sought to bless. One sought to take life; the other sought to give life. 

These two rulers illustrate the spirit of the world and the Spirit of God, two forces actively at work in our world and in our lives.

This is why Paul reminded us in Ephesians 6 to put on the full armor of God. “For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers of this darkness, against evil, spiritual forces in the heavens. For this reason take up the full armor of God, so that you may be able to resist in the evil day, and having prepared everything, to take your stand” (Eph. 6:12-13).

We live in the middle of a real fight between two opposing forces seeking to own our hearts. One, the evil spirit in our present world, like the king of Sodom seeks to take from us and generate chaos and confusion. The other, the Spirit of the living God, like the King of Salem seeks to give life and bring peace and joy.

In our present world, we must recognize that this battle goes on inside of every believer. And we must put on the full armor of God daily that we might withstand the attack of the evil one and faithfully commit to full submission to the Spirit of God. It’s not enough that we deny the evil one; we must say “yes” to God. 

This battle is real and raging. And the people of God must fight with great resolve to ensure our allegiance remains to the only good King, the Lord. 

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus came to bless us.
  • Younger Preschool: Jesus is a priest and king like Melchizedek was, but Jesus is better! Jesus came to bless us. He died on the cross and rose again to give us life with God forever.
  • Older Preschool: Melchizedek means “king of righteousness.” Jesus is a priest and king like Melchizedek was, but Jesus is better! Jesus came to bless us. He died on the cross and rose again so everyone who trusts in Him can have life with God forever.
  • Kids: Melchizedek means “king of righteousness.” Melchizedek reminds us of Jesus, an even greater priest and king who lives forever. Jesus died on the cross and rose again to bless all who trust in Him by providing forgiveness and eternal life.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Who makes everything happen? God makes everything happen.
  • Preschool: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • Kids: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. Nothing is outside of God’s good plan.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Younger Preschool: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Older Preschool: The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:6
  • Kids: I know that the LORD is great; our Lord is greater than all gods. The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:5-6

** Next week: God Provided Isaac (Genesis 21–22)

Sunday Morning 11/21: Unit 3, Session 1: God Made a Covenant with Abraham

Think about all of the choices that we have each day. Just in the morning, we have dozens of different cereals to eat, perhaps that many varieties of milk to pour on top of the cereal, and nearly as many ways to make coffee to go with it. All of these are choices that we often take for granted.

Now think about all of the choices God had as He took a significant step in redemptive history and chose a couple to start a new people from whom the promised Rescuer would come. (Gen. 3:15) We see some of those choices at the tail end of Genesis 11, but we need to remember that God is not confined to choices like we are. He is all-powerful and sovereign; God had an infinite number of choices for this critical couple. 

So whom did God choose? A man named Abram and his barren wife Sarai. Now that’s a curious choice, isn’t it? This is the couple whom God would give descendants as numerous as the stars? (Gen. 15:5) From the world’s perspective, this was a curious choice at best—and a laughable choice at worst. 

But from God’s perspective, Abram and Sarai were a brilliant choice. First, God made it clear from the inception of this new people that He was the One bringing everything to pass. This family was special because God clearly worked in them to bring forth children. This is what Sarai understood when she said, “Who would have told Abraham that Sarah would nurse children? Yet I have borne a son for him in his old age” (Gen. 21:7). That the son of promise, Isaac, married a wife, Rebekah—who was also barren—is not a coincidence. (Gen. 25:21) Nor is it a coincidence that Jesus would be born to a virgin. (Luke 1:34) God is the God who makes possible that which is impossible, including rescuing people from sin. 

Second, it took a while, but in the end, Abram’s faith in God came to fruition because of his wife’s barrenness. This was his barrier to faith in God. This is what he struggled with for so many years. But in the end, Abram’s greatest struggle became the greatest kindling of his faith. God didn’t just begin a people through barrenness; He began a faithful people through it. 

God’s covenant with Abram was certainly amazing. But perhaps His choice of Abram in the first place is even more amazing. 

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God sent Jesus.
  • Younger Preschool: God sent Jesus to earth as part of Abraham’s family. Jesus saves people from their sins.
  • Older Preschool: God promised to bless all the people in the world through Abraham. God sent Jesus to earth as part of Abraham’s family. God blesses all the people on earth through Jesus because Jesus saves people from their sins.
  • Kids: God promised to bless all the world through Abraham. God sent Jesus from His home in heaven to be born on earth into Abraham’s family. Through Jesus, all the nations of the earth are blessed because Jesus saves people from their sins.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Who makes everything happen? God makes everything happen.
  • Preschool: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • Kids: Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. Nothing is outside of God’s good plan.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Younger Preschool: The Lord is great. — Psalm 135:5
  • Older Preschool: The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:6
  • Kids: I know that the LORD is great; our Lord is greater than all gods. The LORD does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the depths. — Psalm 135:5-6

** Next week: Melchizedek Blessed Abraham (Genesis 14; Hebrews 5; 7)

Sunday Morning 11/14: Unit 2, Session 4: People Rebel Against God

We love to measure the health, success, or sustainability of pretty much anything and everything. We measure our kids by their grades in school. We measure teams by their wins and losses. We measure people by their influence and following on social media. In a world obsessed with measuring “success,” we ought to be assessing in our own lives something we cannot see: our motivation. 

We can define motivation simply as the reason we do something. Motivation is the driving force behind the decisions we make. There is a reason for everything that we do—both big and small—but what that motivation is might not be obvious to those around us.

In Genesis 11, Noah’s family had grown and began to rebuild the earth’s population. At some point along the way, they decided to ignore God’s command to spread out and subdue the earth for God’s glory. Instead, the people decided to build a tower to show their greatness. Their motivation was both obvious and arrogant.

Read Psalm 127:1-2. These verses provide a blatant reminder that God is the only true builder. His glory is our only proper motivation. Additionally, this psalm gives us a promise that those who love God will be able to rest from being driven by selfish motivation. 

Doesn’t it sound pretty attractive to be able to rest from selfish motivation that plagues so much of our thinking and behavior? In God’s economy, He’s less worried with the outcome of our decisions and more concerned with the reason for our decisions. That’s not to say that it doesn’t matter what we do. Rather, if our motivation is right—if our hearts are right—our actions will follow. And not only will our motivation and behavior honor God, but much of the anxiety of life will fade away too.

When was the last time you measured your motivation? Is the driving force behind what you do making a name for yourself, your kids, or even your church? Or is the primary desire driving your life boasting in the name of Christ? Read Psalm 127:1 again. May we be driven by God’s glory and not our own.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: People will worship Jesus. 
  • Younger Preschool: People disobeyed God, so God mixed up their language and spread the people over the earth. One day, Jesus will bring His people back together. People from every language will worship Him together.
  • Older Preschool: People tried to make themselves famous instead of God. God mixed up their language so the people spread out over the earth. One day, Jesus will bring His people back together. People from every group and language will worship Him together.
  • Kids: People wanted glory for themselves instead of God. They ignored God’s plan, so God confused their language and scattered them all over the earth. One day, Jesus will gather together all of God’s people—from every tribe and language—and they will worship Him together.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What does it mean to sin? We sin when we disobey God.
  • Older Preschool: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to go against God and His commands.
  • Kids: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to think, speak, or behave in any way that goes against God and His commands.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: We all make wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Younger Preschool: Everyone makes wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Older Preschool: All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23
  • Kids: For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23

** Next week: God Made a Covenant with Abraham (Genesis 12–20)