Sunday Morning (07/31) Unit 11, Session 1: God Chose David to be King (1 Samuel 16)

One of God’s good gifts to us is the way He uses the most unexpected people in the most unexpected ways. We’ve all probably seen this happen at times. A young man or woman that rises to prominence in his or her vocation, but no one saw it coming.

We see this in sports, in business, and other arenas. But in the kingdom of God, it’s not just something you might see occasionally; it’s standard. 

Isaiah 55:9 says, “For as heaven is higher than earth, so my ways are higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

God has been in the business of bringing about surprising stories of unsung heroes since the beginning of time. In 1 Samuel 16, we find one more example of this. God chose to use David, a young boy with a shepherd staff and some musical ability, to lead Israel in a time of desperation.

Do you ever find yourself trying to hone the skills that God has used in others in hopes that He might use you too? Have you ever wished you were wired or gifted differently so you could do something specific for the Lord? Rest assured, God is not interested in only a specific set of gifts or a particular personality type. God desires to use you just the way He made you.

Find comfort in knowing that He didn’t mess up when He made you. He won’t waste a gift He has given you, and He wants you to grow in those ways so that at just the right time and in just the right way, your gifts can be used for His kingdom purposes.

Who would have thought that David’s ability to play the lyre would get him into Saul’s inner circle? God did. It was His plan all along. And it is His plan to use you in great ways too. He will not waste the gifts He’s given you. Be open and willing to serve Him for His glory and your joy.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus is the perfect King.
  • Younger Preschool: People were surprised God chose David to be Israel’s next king. When Jesus came to earth, He seemed like a surprising choice for a king. Jesus is the perfect King who saves us from our sin.
  • Older Preschool: God’s choice of David to be Israel’s next king was surprising. David was the youngest in his family, but God saw David’s heart for the Lord. When Jesus came to earth, He seemed like a surprising choice for a king. Jesus is the perfect King who saves us from our sin and reigns forever.
  • Kids: Samuel anointed David, setting him apart to be the next king. God’s choice for Israel’s king was surprising; David was the youngest in his family, but God saw David’s heart for the Lord. When Jesus came to earth, He seemed like a surprising choice for a king. Jesus is the perfect King who saves us from our sin and reigns forever.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is grace? Grace is when God gives us something good even when we do not deserve it.
  • Older Preschool: What is grace? Grace is when God gives us something good even when we do not deserve it.
  • Kids: What is grace? Grace is when God gives us something good even when we do not deserve it.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God forgives our wrong choices. Ephesians 1:7 
  • Younger Preschool: God forgives our wrong choices. Ephesians 1:7
  • Older Preschool: In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace. Ephesians 1:7
  • Kids: In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace that he richly poured out on us with all wisdom and understanding. Ephesians 1:7-8

** Next week: David Fought Goliath (1 Samuel 17)

Sunday Morning (07/24) Unit 10, Session 4: God is Good to Judge Sin (Genesis 18)

There is something inside of each of us that longs for justice. When your family or community is impacted by an atrocity, there is an innate wiring to every person that desires to those responsible be punished. Where does this come from and what should we do with this?

Our desire for justice comes as a result of our being made in the image of God. We learn from Scripture that God formed each of us (Ps. 139:13) and created us in His image (Gen. 1:27). Being created in the image of God and by the hand of God leaves us with certain characteristics informed by our Creator.

So, what should we do? Should we respond to every act of sin with an act of justice? Should we point and scream when another image bearer demonstrates her sinful nature? Should we ignore evil acts and simply “let God take care of it”?

Genesis 18 speaks to some of this. As God began to unfold His plan to punish the people of Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham stepped in. Abraham knew firsthand just how sinful these people were, how distorted their views of the world were, and how extreme their culture had turned as a result. Yet, he pleaded for God to show mercy.

It’s likely that there were people that Abraham knew and worried about. It’s clear that Abraham didn’t want those who followed God to be punished along with those who did not. But it seems there was something in Abraham that desired God to show mercy to other sinners because he knew his own great need for God’s mercy as well.

When we see that the ground is level at the foot of the cross, our desire for justice is often—at least in part—overcome by a desire for mercy. When we see ourselves in need of the same mercy as the offender we have in our sights, it may likely change how we think and pray.

Ultimately, God is the judge who discerns where there is mercy. Scripture reminds us, “What should we say then? Is there injustice with God? Absolutely not!  For he tells Moses, I will show mercy to whom I will show mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion.” (Rom. 9:14-15)

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus took the punishment for our sins.
  • Younger Preschool: God is good to judge sin, and He always does what is right. Jesus took the punishment for our sin, and Jesus gives life to everyone who trusts in Him.
  • Older Preschool: God is good to judge sin. He is the Judge of all the earth, and He always does what is right. The good news of the gospel is that Jesus took the punishment our sin deserves, and Jesus gives His righteousness to everyone who trusts in Him.
  • Kids: God is good to judge sin. He is the Judge of all the earth, and He always does what is right. God will punish the guilty. The good news of the gospel is that Jesus took the punishment our sin deserves, and everyone who trusts in Him is declared righteous before God.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy.
  • Older Preschool: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy.
  • Kids: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy, sin has broken our relationship with God.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: My eyes have seen the Lord. Isaiah 6:5 
  • Younger Preschool: My eyes have seen the Lord. Isaiah 6:5
  • Older Preschool: I said: Woe is me … because I am a man of unclean lips … and … my eyes have seen the … LORD. Isaiah 6:5
  • Kids: Then I said: Woe is me for I am ruined because I am a man of unclean lips and live among a people of unclean lips, and because my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of Armies. Isaiah 6:5

** Next week: God Chose David to be King (1 Samuel 16)

Sunday Morning 07/17: Unit 10, Session 3: Saul Sinned and Was Rejected (1 Samuel 13-15)

The sacrificial system of the Old Testament was the rhythm and practice of the people of God for many generations. It brought about reminders of the authority of God and the sin of the people. God used these sacrifices as temporary atonement for sin and a foreshadowing of the permanent sacrifice of Jesus that was to come.

Some Old Testament figures practiced these sacrifices with precision as prescribed by God. For others, the sacrifices were a good luck charm or “Get Out of Jail Free” card. In 1 Samuel 14–15, Saul built an altar and used sacrifice to try to earn back the favor of both God and Samuel.

Samuel’s response to these things cut Saul deeply. “Does the Lord take pleasure in burnt offerings and sacrifices as much as in obeying the Lord? Look: to obey is better than sacrifice, to pay attention is better than the fat of rams” (1 Sam. 15:22).

The answer to Samuel’s rhetorical question is a resounding “No!” God does not desire sacrifice more than obedience; He desires obedient sacrifice. Though it was possible to sacrifice and disobey, it was never possible to obey and not sacrifice. God’s desire was for sacrifice to come from a broken and contrite heart that understood the weight of one’s sin and the need for forgiveness before a holy and righteous God. To practice sacrifice with any other motivation was to disobey. 

Though we don’t live under the ceremonial law of the Old Testament, we do live under the authority of God. And though we don’t use the blood and meat of animals to try to satisfy God, we are certainly guilty of trying to please Him with religious practices.

For some Christians, there is a quiet hope that checking the boxes of daily disciplines will satisfy God’s wrath toward our sin. For some Christians, the applause of men drives the public display of their faith. In either instance, Christians are seeking to earn the favor of both God and man through their “sacrifice,” when God’s desire is for our whole-hearted obedience out of love for Him.

Consider today what areas you may be tempted to try and impress God or earn back His love. Confess those things and be reminded that what God wants is your love for Him above all else and your confidence that His sacrifice of Christ is sufficient to make you right before Him.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: King Jesus obeyed God in everything He did.
  • Younger Preschool: God made Saul king, but King Saul did not obey God. God sent His Son, Jesus, to be king over everything. King Jesus obeyed God perfectly.
  • Older Preschool: God made Saul king, but King Saul did not obey God. God sent His Son, Jesus, to be king over everything. King Jesus obeyed God perfectly and died so we can be forgiven.
  • Kids: God gave the Israelites a king, but Saul did not obey God. God had a plan to send His Son, Jesus. King Jesus trusted and obeyed God perfectly and died so sinners could be forgiven and accepted.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy.
  • Older Preschool: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy.
  • Kids: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy, sin has broken our relationship with God.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: My eyes have seen the Lord. Isaiah 6:5 
  • Younger Preschool: My eyes have seen the Lord. Isaiah 6:5
  • Older Preschool: I said: Woe is me … because I am a man of unclean lips … and … my eyes have seen the … LORD. Isaiah 6:5
  • Kids: Then I said: Woe is me for I am ruined because I am a man of unclean lips and live among a people of unclean lips, and because my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of Armies. Isaiah 6:5

** Next week: God Is Good to Judge Sin (Genesis 18)

Sunday Morning 07/07: Unit 10, Session 2: God Made Saul King (1 Samuel 11)

Gilgal was a place the Israelites knew well. It was the first place their ancestors set foot in the promised land; the place where they built a memorial of 12 stones after crossing the Jordan with the ark of the covenant; a place that they looked back on and remembered the power, greatness, and provision of God. Gilgal wasn’t a place of convenience, but rather a place of significance.

Have you ever taken the time to revisit places of your past? Maybe you’ve driven past your childhood home and school, your first home, or the hospital where a family member was born. These nostalgic journeys can bring back all sorts of memories of heartbreak and victory, sadness and joy. Revisiting the past might flood your heart and mind with things you had long forgotten as well as things that can never be forgotten.

In the fast-paced world we live in today, we don’t go back often enough. For many, thinking about the past only slows down productivity. We rely on timeline photos as reminders but then quickly scroll to the news of the day and our plans for tomorrow. 

What if we regularly returned to the past? What if we frequented the memorials of God’s power, greatness, and provision? It may be that part of why we run so hard after the tyranny of the urgent is because we’ve lost sight of God’s faithfulness through the ages.

It may not be a nostalgic drive through your hometown or a trip to the mountaintop where you were first gripped by the greatness of God, but a stroll down memory lane recalling the work that God has done is so very good for the soul. 

The Israelites didn’t return to Gilgal because it was easy. They returned to Gilgal because amid their present circumstances, they needed to remember. And so do we. 

Reflect on the great things that God has done—the ways you’ve seen His power, greatness, and provision. And as you do, let it grow your gratitude and hopefulness. For, as James 1:17 says, “Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.”

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God sent Jesus to be our King.
  • Younger Preschool: God chose Saul to be the king in Israel. With God’s help, Saul brought the Israelites together to win the battle. God sent His Son, Jesus, to be our King forever. Jesus came to rescue people from sin and death.
  • Older Preschool: God chose Saul to be the king in Israel. With God’s help, Saul brought the Israelites together to win the battle. God sent His Son, Jesus, to be our King forever. Jesus came to rescue people from sin and death.
  • Kids: God chose Saul to be the Israelites’ king. With God’s help, Saul brought the Israelites together to defeat their enemy. God sent His Son, Jesus, to be our King forever. Jesus brings together everyone who trusts in Him and gives us victory over sin and death.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy.
  • Older Preschool: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy.
  • Kids: Why does sin separate us from God? Because God is holy, sin has broken our relationship with God.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: My eyes have seen the Lord. Isaiah 6:5 
  • Younger Preschool: My eyes have seen the Lord. Isaiah 6:5
  • Older Preschool: I said: Woe is me … because I am a man of unclean lips … and … my eyes have seen the … LORD. Isaiah 6:5
  • Kids: Then I said: Woe is me for I am ruined because I am a man of unclean lips and live among a people of unclean lips, and because my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of Armies. Isaiah 6:5

** Next week: Saul Sinned and Was Rejected (1 Samuel 13–15)

Sunday Morning 06/26: Unit 9, Session 6: God Takes Sin Seriously (Ephesians 2)

What comes to mind when you think about sin? Consider your emotions—does the thought of sin make you sad? Angry? Indifferent? To fully understand the beauty of salvation and the power of grace, you must take sin seriously.

Consider what our sin says about God. Sin says God may be powerful, but not enough to deserve ultimate authority in our lives. Sin exploits God’s mercy and disrespects His patience. Sin says God is not worthy of our obedience. Sin isn’t just a mistake; it is serious. Why? Our sins are first and foremost against an infinitely holy God.

In Ephesians 2, Paul describes our state apart from Christ not merely as broken or flawed; he says we are dead in our sin. We are not simply wrong people who need to do better; rather, we are dead people who need to be made alive.

God confronts this bad news with a surprising response. Look at Ephesians 2:4-5: “But God, who is rich in mercy, because of his great love that he had for us, made us alive with Christ even though we were dead in trespasses.”

The good news of the gospel increases in its gravity as our awareness and hatred of sin increases. If sin seems like no big deal, the cross is not very impressive. When we have a right understanding of the seriousness of our sin, the gospel is good news—the revelation that we who are dead in our sin can have true life as a free gift in Christ.

As you prepare to teach, take a moment to reflect on your sin and to thank God for His mercy. Pray that God would graciously reveal to kids their sinful nature and desperate need for salvation as well as His holiness and provision of Jesus as the Savior they need.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Everyone who believes in Jesus will live with God forever.
  • Younger Preschool: God loves us and sent Jesus to die on the cross for our sins. Jesus rose from the dead. Everyone who believes in Him will live with God forever.
  • Older Preschool: God takes sin seriously. We deserve to die for our sins, but God loves us and sent Jesus to die on the cross for our sins. Jesus rose from the dead. Everyone who trusts in Him has life with God forever.
  • Kids: God takes sin seriously. People deserve to die for their sins, but God loves us and sent His Son, Jesus, to defeat death by dying on the cross for our sins and rising from the dead. Everyone who trusts in Jesus has eternal life.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is separation from God.
  • Older Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is death.
  • Kids: What is the fair payment for sin? The fair payment for sin is death.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Younger Preschool: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Older Preschool: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23 
  • Kids: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23

** Next week: Israel Demanded a King (1 Samuel 8–10)

Sunday Morning 06/19: Unit 9, Session 5: Eli’s Sons Disobeyed God (1 Samuel 4-6)

The ark of the covenant was a physical reminder of God’s tangible presence with his people. Rather than treat the ark with reverence, they treated the ark as a sort of good luck charm. In our Bible story today, we see what happened when the ark was taken from the people of Israel. 

Except in times of war or when the people of Israel were on the move, the ark was kept in the holy of holies in the tabernacle. Once a year, a priest would approach the ark and sprinkle blood on the mercy seat on the ark’s top for the forgiveness of the people’s sins. The ark and what it represented was temporal and pointed forward to the substantial reality of God who would come and live among His people.

When we realize that Jesus lived a perfect life and then died in our place, we see that Jesus is better than the ark because He is always with us. We are filled with thankfulness. 

Jesus is better than the bulls and goats whose blood was sprinkled on the ark because His sacrifice is once, for all time (Heb. 10:10). This should move us to worship. 

Finally, we should be humbled and filled with confidence when we realize that Jesus, who lived perfectly in human flesh, died and then was resurrected and ascended into heaven where He, in His glorified human body, prays for us.

This should give you confidence in this life that no matter what we face, God’s Holy Spirit is with us. The Son is interceding for us. Because Jesus stands between the Father and us, we can “approach the throne of grace with boldness, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us at the proper time” (Heb. 4:16). We can go before God daily because of Jesus.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God sent His Son, Jesus, to be with His people forever.
  • Younger Preschool: The ark of God reminded the Israelites that God was with them. Many years later God sent His very own Son, Jesus, to be with His people.
  • Older Preschool: The ark of God reminded the Israelites that God was with them. Many years later, God gave His people something even better to remind them that He was with them. God sent His Son, Jesus. One of Jesus’ names is Immanuel, which means “God with us.”
  • Kids: The ark of God reminded the Israelites that God was with them. Years later, God gave His people something greater than a sign that He was with them; God gave them His Son, Jesus—God in the flesh. One of Jesus’ names is Immanuel, which means “God with us.”

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is separation from God.
  • Older Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is death.
  • Kids: What is the fair payment for sin? The fair payment for sin is death.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Younger Preschool: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Older Preschool: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23 
  • Kids: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23

** Next week: God Takes Sin Seriously (Ephesians 2)

Sunday Morning 06/12: Unit 9, Session 4: God Provided for Hannah

When was the last time you prayed fervently to God? What did you need? Did He answer in a way you expected?

When Hannah wanted a baby, she cried out to God with great earnestness so much that the priest Eli thought she was drunk. Hannah had confidence that God heard her prayer. She understood that one of the evidences of the understanding and the belief that God hears and answers prayer is persistence in prayer. 

Hannah prayed with a passion and bitterness of heart that looked to God at first and fixed her gaze upon the Lord only. She didn’t even notice Eli watching her. She believed that God heard and God acted as a result of our small prayers. She prayed with passion because she believed God heard her. 

But what if our prayers seem not to be heard? Hannah is a great example for us of what C. H. Spurgeon observed about prayer in his book Illustrations and Meditations: “Frequently the richest answers are not the speediest … A prayer may be all the longer on its voyage because it is bringing us a heavier freight of blessing. Delayed answers are not only trials of faith, but they give us an opportunity of honoring God by our steadfast confidence in Him under apparent repulses.”

Finally, Hannah’s persistence in prayer showed that she understood she could not fix her situation but the all-powerful God who hears and acts could. The next year, Hannah came with a baby in her arms. A baby she named Samuel, which means “God heard.” Samuel’s life was a constant reminder to Hannah and all of Israel that God lives, hears, and acts.

As you prepare to serve kids through teaching, remember that even prayers that seem to be delayed are meant to strengthen our resolve to pray and to honor God with a confidence that can’t be shaken. We serve a God who hears us, and because He hears us, no prayer is too small or too big that we can’t bring Him.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus showed the world what God is like.
  • Younger Preschool: Samuel told people what God is like and what He would do. Jesus, the Son of God, told people about God’s plan and showed the world what God is like.
  • Older Preschool: Samuel told people what God is like and what He would do. Jesus, the Son of God, came to earth as a human. He told people about God’s plan and showed the world what God is like.
  • Kids: Hannah trusted God and sent Samuel away from home to serve God with his whole life. God sent Jesus from heaven to earth to be our Savior. Just as Samuel used God’s words to tell people about God, Jesus—the Word who became flesh—perfectly shows us what God is like.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is separation from God.
  • Older Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is death.
  • Kids: What is the fair payment for sin? The fair payment for sin is death.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Younger Preschool: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Older Preschool: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23 
  • Kids: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23

** Next week: Eli’s Sons Disobeyed God (1 Samuel 4–6)

Sunday Morning 5/29: Unit 9, Session 2: God Used Samson

Samson is one of those characters in the Bible you don’t easily forget. He was strong, handsome, successful, and blind. He is what in literature is called an anti-type. He is a type of Christ in all the wrong ways. Samson was consecrated from an early age yet disobeyed his covenant promises and dishonored his parents. When tempted, he gave in rather than resisting.

Before Samson was physically blinded, he was blind to his weakness and to the source of his strength. Samson should have turned the nation’s eyes from themselves and pointed them to God; instead, he lived for his own appetite by doing what is right in his own eyes. God used him despite his flaws and failures. The sad reality of Samson’s life was that it wasn’t until he was captured by his enemies who gouged out his physical eyes that he truly started to “see.”

Unlike Samson, Jesus came into the world not “to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28). Jesus not only obeyed His Father but obeyed in such a way that we have a model for what obedience to God looks like. 

Jesus is more than a model; He is also our substitute who lived a perfect life and died in our place for our disobedience. He, like Samson, placed His hand on the twin pillars of sin and death and destroyed them. But unlike Samson, Jesus didn’t stay dead. He lives, and He opens the eyes of those who are blind to see the beauty of God in the face of Christ.

This week, pray that God will open the eyes of kids you lead so that they would see Jesus as more beautiful than anything else. Pray that rather than running from Him and doing what is right in their own eyes, they will run to Jesus and find mercy in time of need. (Heb. 4:16)

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus died and rose again to rescue God’s people from sin and give them life with God forever.
  • Younger Preschool: God sent Samson to help His people. God sent Jesus to die and rise again to rescue God’s people from sin and give them life with God forever.
  • Older Preschool: Samson died because of his sin, but God used Samson’s death to help His people. Samson reminds us of Jesus. Jesus never sinned, but He died for our sin. Jesus died and rose again to rescue God’s people from sin and give them life with God forever.
  • Kids: Samson’s sin led to his own death, but God used his death to save the Israelites from their enemies. Samson’s story reminds us of Jesus. Jesus never sinned, but God sent Him to die on the cross and rise again to rescue people from sin and give them eternal life.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is separation from God.
  • Older Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is death.
  • Kids: What is the fair payment for sin? The fair payment for sin is death.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Younger Preschool: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Older Preschool: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23 
  • Kids: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23

** Next week: God Provided for Ruth (Ruth)

Sunday Morning 5/22: Unit 9, Session 1: The People Kept Sinning

In the Book of Judges, we see a cycle of sin, oppression, repentance, rescue, obedience, and then back to sin. The condition of man’s heart when left to himself will “do what is right in his own eyes” (Judges 21:25). Our own hearts lead us to sinful behavior that leads to enslavement to sin. Judges reveals who we are apart from God’s grace.

The Book of Judges also uncovers what God is like. He is rich in love and quick to restore those who turn to Him. He is gracious; every time the people of Israel repented and turned from their sins, He sent deliverance. He restored Israel from the edge of destruction. God also revealed Himself as able to save no matter how difficult or deep the captivity. In fact, we see God’s mercy clearly when He sent the judge Samson when the people didn’t even ask for deliverance. In these warrior-deliver stories, God showed that what His people really needed was a king— not just any king but a perfect king who would rule His people with perfect justice and mercy. 

It is easy for us as modern readers to judge the people of Israel harshly. How could they turn away from a God who delivered them from their enemies over and over again? But how easy is it for us to be tempted away from love for God and love created things more than the Creator? 

What gives us hope and comfort is that in a world where it feels like there is chaos all around us, we know that God in His mercy is a God who rescues. He didn’t send a flawed warrior to deliver us from the effects of our sin temporarily. He sent His only Son to defeat sin and death and restore the relationship that sinners could never fix on their own. 

Today as you prepare to teach, rest in the knowledge that God has gone before you. Prepare your heart to point kids to Jesus over and over as the true Deliverer and the true peace for which their hearts desperately long.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: Jesus rescues us from sin and changes our hearts.
  • Younger Preschool: God sent His Son, Jesus, to save us from sin and change our hearts to want to obey Him. 
  • Older Preschool: After God’s people sinned, the judges helped God’s people obey God again. But the judges could not change the people’s hearts and make them love God. God had a plan. He sent His Son, Jesus, to change His people’s hearts and save them from sin forever.
  • Kids: The judges saved the people from the consequences of their sin, but not the cause of it. God’s plan was to one day send a true Deliverer—Jesus, His own Son—to be the King of His people. Jesus saves people from sin forever.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is separation from God.
  • Older Preschool: What is the punishment for sin? The punishment for sin is death.
  • Kids: What is the fair payment for sin? The fair payment for sin is death.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Younger Preschool: God gives life forever. Romans 6:23
  • Older Preschool: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23 
  • Kids: For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 6:23

** Next week: God Used Samson (Judges 13–16)

Sunday Morning 5/15: Unit 8, Session 4: God’s Miracles Prove Who He Is

The Bible is a supernatural book filled with accounts of supernatural events. Dozens of miracles are recorded in the Bible. Each miracle points to a greater reality and reveals to us what God is like. 

In the story of Israel’s crossing the Jordan, we see how God hears our cries and provides for us in miraculous ways. Throughout Israel’s history, we see miracles that reveal the kind of God we serve: a God who is close; a God who sees, hears, and acts.

In his book Miracles, C.S. Lewis said, “The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this.”

All of Scripture reveals the kind of God who comes close, who miraculously took on flesh and lived a perfect life among us. God the Son died in our place and rose from the dead. In His death, He conquered both sin and death. He came back to life and ascended to the right hand of the Father, where He lives to make intercession for us. (Heb. 7:25) We should be moved when we consider that not only do we have a God who hears us, but who sees us, lived among us, and lives to make intercession for us.

Through the miracle of Christ’s finished work, we can be forgiven and reconciled to God. We who were far off and without hope in this life have hope because of the miraculous birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus.

As you prepare to teach, pray and ask the God of miracles to move in the hearts of your kids as they hear the gospel proclaimed. Finally, say a prayer of thanksgiving to a miracle-working God who sees, hears, and acts for His glory and our good.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God raised Jesus from the dead. Jesus is alive.
  • Younger Preschool: God raised Jesus from the dead to prove He is the Son of God who rescues us from sin.
  • Older Preschool: Jesus died on the cross for our sins, but He rose from the dead and is alive! God raised Jesus from the dead to prove He is the Son of God who rescues us from sin.
  • Kids: Jesus died on the cross for our sins, but He didn’t stay dead. God was pleased with Jesus’ sacrifice and miraculously raised Jesus from the dead to prove He is the Son of God and salvation is found in Him.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What is a miracle? A miracle is something that shows God’s power.
  • Older Preschool: What is a miracle? A miracle is something God does that usually cannot be done.
  • Kids: What is a miracle? A miracle is something God does that usually cannot be done so that we can know He is all-powerful.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: God shows His strength to people. Psalm 77:14 
  • Younger Preschool: God shows His strength to people. Psalm 77:14
  • Older Preschool: You are the God who works wonders; you revealed your strength among the peoples. Psalm 77:14
  • Kids: You are the God who works wonders; you revealed your strength among the peoples. Psalm 77:14

** Next week: The People Kept Sinning (Judges 2)