Sunday Morning 2/23: Unit 2, Session 2: Abraham and Isaac

This week, kids learn that God kept His promise to give Abraham and Sarah a son, and they named him Isaac. Isaac was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too. When Abraham was well over 100 years old, God tested Abraham. God instructed him to sacrifice Isaac on a mountain. How could this be? Abraham had waited so long for this child!

But Abraham obeyed. He got up early the next day and left on his trip. Instead of waiting around to see if God would change His mind, he saddled the donkey, took the wood, two servants, and his son, and left on the journey as God commanded.

As Isaac walked with his father, he noticed something was missing. They had the wood and the fire, but “Where is the lamb?” Isaac asked. Abraham answered that God Himself would provide. Abraham had supreme faith that God was able to do anything. Before going up the mountain, Abraham told the servants, “Stay here … we’ll come back” (Gen. 22:5). Hebrews 11:19 also gives us a peek inside Abraham’s mind: “He considered God to be able even to raise someone from the dead.”

God did provide. He provided a ram in place of Isaac, who was spared. After what we might imagine was quite a worship service, Abraham and Isaac returned home.

This week, help your kids understand that in the New Testament, God brings through John the Baptist the final answer to Isaac’s inquiry, “Where is the lamb?” “Here is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (John 1:29). Abraham showed his love for God by being willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. This is how God showed His love for us: He sent His Son, Jesus, to die on the cross so that we could have eternal life through Him. He was the sacrifice made in our place so we can live.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made a promise.
    • Abraham trusted God to keep His promise.
    • God gave a ram to use as the sacrifice.
    • God promised to send Jesus into Abraham’s family.
  • Preschool
    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful.
    • Abraham trusted God.
  • Kids
    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful and does everything for His glory and our good.
    • Abraham trusted God even when he did not understand God’s plan.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29b for Babies and Toddlers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “Isaac and Rebekah” (Genesis 24)

Sunday Morning 2/16: Unit 2, Session 1: God's Covenant with Abraham

Over the next few weeks of the Gospel Project for Kids, kids will learn that God was still working out His plan to send Jesus into the world to rescue us from sin. Since the beginning, God wanted to bless and provide for His people. Genesis 11 records the generations between Noah and Abram. Noah’s son Shem had a family. Through Shem’s line, God would keep His promise to send a Savior. Shem’s seventh-great grandson was named Abram. Abram was born in Ur of the Chaldeans.

Abram was in his homeland when God spoke to him. God told Abram: “Go out from your land, your relatives, and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make you into a great nation, I will bless you, I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, I will curse anyone who treats you with contempt, and all the peoples on earth will be blessed through you” (Gen. 12:1-3).

By faith, Abram obeyed God. He traveled toward the land of Canaan with his wife, Sarai; his father, Terah; and his nephew, Lot. They settled in Haran, about 600 miles from their home. When Abram was 75 years old, he left Haran with his wife, his nephew, and all their possessions.

Genesis 15 records the Abrahamic covenant. The word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision. God made a covenant with Abram and promised to give him offspring as numerous as the stars in the sky and to give his family the land of Canaan. At 99 years old, Abram was still childless. How would God keep His promise if Abram didn’t have any children? But God was serious about the covenant; He always keeps His promises. God even changed Abram’s name to Abraham, which means “Father of a Multitude.”

As you talk to your kids this week, help them discover God promised to bless all the world through Abraham. God sent Jesus from His home in heaven to be born on earth into Abraham’s family. Through Jesus, all the nations of the earth are blessed because Jesus saves people from their sins.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made a promise.
    • God made a promise to Abraham.
    • God always keeps His promises.
    • God promised to send Jesus into Abraham’s family.
  • Preschool
    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful.
    • God promised to bless all the world through Abraham.
  • Kids
    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful and does everything for His glory and our good.
    • God made a covenant to bless all the world through Abraham.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29b for Babies and Toddlers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “Abraham and Isaac” (Genesis 22)

Sunday Morning 2/9: Unit 1, Session 6: The Suffering of Job

Why would we hear the story of Job while studying stories from Genesis? Most biblical authorities believe, based on subject matter and language, that Job was a contemporary to the patriarchs. Job fits chronologically into this period in history.

Job was a wealthy man who loved God. At the beginning of the book, God allows Satan to test Job’s faithfulness. Job lost everything, and he asked God why these things were happening. God answered Job, and His response reveals that God alone is all-powerful, sovereign, and good.

“Have you ever in your life commanded the morning or assigned the dawn its place?” (Job 38:12). God has. He is all-powerful. “Does the eagle soar at your command?” (Job 39:27). It does at God’s. He is sovereign. “Who provides the raven’s food when its young cry out to God?” (Job 38:41). God provides. He is good.

Everyone suffers—those who follow God and those who don’t. While the Book of Job speaks volumes to the problem of human suffering, it is also an important picture of how a suffering person should relate to God. Job didn’t understand his suffering and he even doubted God, but Job’s suffering ultimately brought him closer to God. God is always in control, even when His people can’t see the reason behind the suffering God allows.

As you share with your kids this week, help them see that following Jesus is worth it. God is good, present, and in control. We can trust Him even when we don’t understand the pain we have to endure. At the cross, God used the ultimate pain to bring about the ultimate good: our future and final salvation from sin. 

Job learned that God is all-powerful, sovereign, and good. When we face suffering, we can hope in God. God sent Jesus, the only truly innocent One, to suffer and die so that everyone who trusts in Him can have forgiveness and eternal life.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made everything.
    • Sad things happened to Job, but he loved God.
    • God is in charge of everything He made.
    • God sent Jesus because He loves us.
  • Preschool
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • Job learned that God is always good.
  • Kids
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • Job learned that God is good, even in suffering.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “God’s Covenant with Abraham” (Genesis 12; 15; 17)

Sunday Morning 2/2: Unit 1, Session 5: The Tower of Babel

Following the flood, God commanded Noah in Genesis 9:1 to “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth.” This command echoes the one given to Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:28. God intended the paradise of the garden to spread into the whole world, but sinful people had other desires.

Genesis 10 accounts for the nations that spread out in the land after the flood (Gen. 10:32). The people moved east and settled in a valley. This story continues the cycle of distrust and disobedience to God. In Genesis 11:2, Scripture indicates that instead of filling the earth as God commanded, the people devised a plan to settle in one place and build a city and a large tower into the sky.

Read Genesis 11:4. The people’s motive was clear: “Let us make a name for ourselves.” The people didn’t want to be scattered. They didn’t believe God would give them what was good if they obeyed Him. They sought to obtain for themselves what they believed was good.

The people tried to build a monument with its top in the sky, but they succeeded only in separating themselves from God and from each other. God confused their language and scattered them over the earth. They were unable to finish building the city, so the city was called Babel—which sounds like the Hebrew word for “confused”—because there the Lord confused the people’s language.

As you share with your kids this week, help them see God’s better plan: His plan not for people to reach up to Him, but His plan to reach down to people by sending His Son, Jesus, to live the perfect life we couldn’t live and die the death we don’t want to die. Through Jesus, God brings together people of every tongue, tribe, and nation; we are all one in Christ. That is the gospel. Pray that your children would have open hearts to receive it.

People chose to give glory to themselves instead of God. They ignored God’s plan, so God confused their language and scattered the people all over the earth. One day, Jesus will gather together all of God’s people—people from every tribe and people who speak all kinds of languages—and they will worship Him together. (Revelation 7:9-10.)

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made everything.
    • God mixed up people’s words.
    • People spread out all over the earth.
    • One day, Jesus will bring people together again.
  • Preschool
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • People wanted to build a tower to make themselves famous. 
  • Kids
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • People tried to build a tower to glorify themselves instead of God.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “The Suffering of Job” (Job)

Sunday Morning 1/26: Unit 1, Session 4: Noah and the Ark

Adam and Eve left the garden to start a life out in the world. Despite the grief of their sins, imagine their joy as their family grew. With each birth, maybe Eve hoped this son would be the one to end the curse of sin, to crush the head of the snake. (Gen. 3:15) But Adam and Eve witnessed sin’s effects on their own children: Cain murdered Abel. Cain was not the Promised One, and neither was Abel.

Some time later, Eve gave birth to another son, Seth. Seth lived 912 years. He saw the earth’s population grow as God sustained generation after generation. Less than 20 years after his death, Seth’s sixth-great-grandson, Noah was born.

By this time—10 generations after Adam—people had stopped following God. Scripture describes a deplorable situation: “Human wickedness was widespread on the earth … every inclination of the human mind was nothing but evil all the time” (Gen. 6:5).

God decided to send a flood to cleanse the earth. He was right to punish this sin. The waters would cover the earth and destroy everything. God graciously chose to save one man and his family, so he warned Noah about the flood and told him to build an ark.

Noah believed God’s warning about the coming judgment. He obediently worked to build the ark. But the work took years, and Noah likely faced ridicule from his friends and neighbors. Was Noah crazy, building a boat where there was no water?

Finally, God’s judgment came. Floodwaters covered the earth. Every living thing was destroyed, but Noah and his family were safe inside the ark. God rescued Noah’s family—the family His own Son would be born into. God rescued Noah and his family from the flood. The story of Noah points ahead to a greater rescue. God’s Son, Jesus—the only perfectly righteous One—came to take the punishment for our sin. By trusting in Him, we are saved from the punishment our sin deserves. 

As you share this story with your kids, remind them that Jesus would warn of God’s coming judgment too, but instead of condemning the world, Jesus would give up His life to rescue sinners.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made everything.
    • God covered the earth with water.
    • God kept Noah’s family safe.
    • God sent Jesus because He loves us.
  • Preschool
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • God rescued Noah and his family.
  • Kids
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • God punished sin but chose to rescue Noah and his family.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “The Tower of Babel” (Genesis 11)

Sunday Morning 1/19: Unit 1, Session 3: Sin Entered the World

Last week, kids learned that God created people to live with Him in a perfect relationship forever. This week, kids learn that Adam and Eve enjoyed all that was good in the garden of Eden. The Lord gave them only one restriction: “You must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,” and the punishment for disobeying was severe: “You will certainly die” (Gen. 2:17). 

Before the fall, Adam and Eve enjoyed a loving, two-way relationship with God. The garden was a true paradise. God filled the garden with good gifts so that they might enjoy them and give thanks to God. This glorifies God. All of that changed when Adam and Eve gave in to the serpent’s temptation. Eve believed the lie that leads many of us to sin: Maybe God is holding out on me.

Adam and Eve desired something more: the wisdom the fruit offered. But when their eyes were opened, they were aware of their nakedness and they felt ashamed. Surely the Lord’s heart broke at their act of disobedience and rebellion. Because of their sin, He cast them out of the garden. Though they did not die right away, sin’s effect was immediate and thorough. Their lives and their children’s lives—and the lives of all of mankind—would be forever affected by their choice.

God did not leave Adam and Eve without hope. He promised that one of Eve’s descendants would strike the head of the serpent. (Gen. 3:15) Each generation after Eve hoped that one of their children would be the promised One—the One who would crush the head of the snake and put an end to the curse over creation.

As you talk with your kids about this story, emphasize that ever since Adam and Eve sinned, all people have been sinners. Our sin separates us from God, but God still loves us. God promised a Rescuer would come from Eve’s family. God sent His Son, Jesus, to rescue people from sin and bring them back to God.

Sin is a big problem that needs a big solution. At just the right time, God sent His Son into the world, born as a baby. Matthew 1:21 says, “You are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” As the kids you teach become increasingly aware of the bad news—that we are all sinners from birth—rejoice with them over the good news: “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Tim. 1:15).

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made everything.
    • God made people to think and choose.
    • Adam and Eve chose not to obey God.
    • God loves us even when we make wrong choices.
  • Preschool
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • Adam and Eve broke God’s one rule.
  • Kids
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • Adam and Eve broke God’s law, and their sin separated them from God.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “Noah and the Ark” (Genesis 6–9)

Sunday Morning 1/12: Unit 1, Session 2: God Created People

This week, kids learn that on the sixth day of creation, God created man in His own image. God formed the man out of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. (Gen. 2:7) Man was set apart as different from the rest of God’s creation. God skillfully formed man out of dust as a potter forms a pot out of clay. (See Isa. 64:8.) He put His own breath into man.

God sustained and provided for the man. He planted a garden in Eden and put the man there to work it and keep it. (Gen. 2:8,15) Then God gave the man a command. God told the man, “You must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.” Then God explained the consequences, “For on the day you eat from it, you will certainly die” (Gen. 2:17).

Then God made woman from the man’s rib. She was a suitable helper for him. Both man and woman were created in God’s image. The first man, Adam, and the first woman, Eve, lived in the garden and enjoyed God’s friendship.

This week, help your kids think about what it means to be made in the image of God. It means we are made like Him, or patterned after Him. God does not have a physical body; He is Spirit, and He has given each of us a spirit. God gives people the ability to think and to feel emotions and to make choices. He gives us the ability to understand right and wrong.

God created people in His own image and provides for everything He made. People are special because God made people to live forever in a relationship with Him. Through His Son, Jesus, we can have eternal life with God just as He planned. Out of His great love for the people He made, God sent His Son, Jesus—“the image of the invisible God” (Col. 1:15) and “the exact expression of his nature” (Heb. 1:3). God the Son became fully man, acting as the second Adam, to bring life to those who are in Him. (See 1 Cor. 15:45-49.)

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • God made everything.
    • God made people in His likeness.
    • God loves and cares for the people He made.
    • God made people to love Him and others.
  • Preschool
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • God created people in His own image, and He loves us.
  • Kids
    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
    • God created people in His own image, and He loves us.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)

NEXT WEEK 

  • “Sin Entered the World” (Genesis 3)